Video Production and Editing - Glossary of Terms



We've combined some of the most common video production, film production and post production terms in this glossary.
Terms are grouped alphabetically - Please select from the list below.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


T


Tail
- The end of a shot or a roll is called the tail.

Tail Slate or End Slate - Sometimes it is necessary to mark a shot at the end rather than at the beginning. When this is done it is called a tail slate. It is customary to call “Tail Slate!” just before clapping the slate, so that the person syncing the film does not get confused. To easily distinguish a tail slate, the slate is held upside down when marking the shot.

Take - Multiple versions of the same shot are called takes.

Telecine - A machine for transferring film to video.

Text Box - A box surrounding text created by the Titling filter. Allows for the text to be moved or adjusted in one piece.

Time Lapse - Time lapse is when single frame shooting is used to dramatically speed up the action over the course of a long period of time. Typically it is a process where a single frame is shot after a consistent pause. It could be one frame every ten seconds, or one frame every hour, and such.

Time Line - The graphic representation of a program displayed in the Sequencer window.

Tilt - Vertical camera rotation (up and down) from a single axis, as on a tripod.

Tint Filter - A filter that produces the appearance of viewing video through colored glass.

Title Safe Area - The standard area of a video in which text can be seen on a television screen. ( televisions overscan so blanking errors will not be seen, this is not as much of a problem these days but was a problem in the days of analogue TV ).

Tracking - Lateral camcorder movement that travels with a moving subject. The camcorder should maintain a regulated distance from the subject.

Transition - The change from one clip to another in a video program.

Trim Handles - The frames before and after the In and Out points for a source clip to allow for trimming and transitions.

Two-Shot - A camera view including two subjects, most generally applicable to interview situations.